UPCOMING SCREENING IN CONCORD, MA ON MAY 1st. FOR MORE DETAILS CLICK HERE.

Carola Domar was a high-spirited, resourceful individual with generous instincts, caught in a tumultuous time. As a young Jew in Nazi Germany, Carola yearned for social acceptance and for the German identity she once took for granted. She escaped in her teens and came to the U.S. on her own. Carola spent much of her life searching for a specific kind of community--one connected to nature and guided by modernist ideals--and ultimately found it in Concord, MA, a New England town outside Boston. Carola’s story is all the more remarkable for the spirit of forgiveness with which she ultimately came to terms with her past and reconnected with her former homeland.

Carola's experience is presented as two interwoven narratives drawn from a 1998 USC Shoah Foundation Institute interview of Carola Domar, and a more recent interview undertaken by this filmmaker of her daughter, Alice Domar. The film is conceived as an educational tool, primarily for young people.


THE FILMMAKER:

Susan Rieder

SUSAN ORLEANS RIEDER has a background in history and art.  Her interest in oral histories began one summer, as a researcher in England.  She holds an MA in Art History from the University of California, Berkeley, and has worked at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston and the Harvard University Art Museums. Her research focused on the social context of late nineteenth-century photography and posters. This work has helped inform Susan’s approach to visual narratives and to historical subjects in video.  Her introduction to filmmaking began as a researcher for the art history filmmaker Judith Weschler.  Susan is indebted to Sam Krueger, her co-editor, who contributed to the later stages of Exile and Community.